My art for the Maelstrom books

This is sort of an old story, since the three Maelstrom books, two by Brian Keene and one by Kelli Owen, have been out for a few months now. But, as with many things, life managed to get in the way of posting the art that I did for the run.

I decided to post them all again, save for the two I already posted (here and here, go check them out). I’m happy with them, though with all things there are parts I would change now. But, that’s the way of the artist.… Read the rest

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Russ’s Art Blog: The Blind Girl

We’re back on a single piece of art this week (since I couldn’t decide on a different topic), this time it’s John Everett Millais’ The Blind Girl (Oil on canvas, 1854-1856, 32 1/2″ x 24 1/2″). It’s one of those pieces where the title really does impact what you see in the image, or at least makes it clear.

It’s an image of duality, of great beauty but of disturbing meaning.  A first glance is a visual feast, showing the beauty of nature, the unusual double rainbow that’s hard to come by in real life, and even the beautiful butterfly on the girl’s shoulder. … Read the rest

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This Week’s Art: The Lovers

 

Here’s another of the images that I posted on the Message Board of the Damned so long ago.  This is Rene Magritte’s The Lovers (1928, oil, 21″ x 29″, aka Les Amants), a piece which I’ve had ready to post for some time, but decided to hold onto. It’s just such an interesting, disturbing piece (maybe) that I had to finally write about it (well, again).

Magritte’s image is probably one of the most open to interpretation that I’ve ever seen.  It can really be taken in just about any context, and the experiences of the viewer play a great part in that. … Read the rest

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This week’s art: Death

This is Jacek Malczewski’s Death (1902, Oil on panel), and if you were a visitor to the former Message Boards of the Damned you may recognize this piece.  It’s one of my personal favorites, filled with everything that makes a piece of art great.

Malczewski is an important artist in Europe especially, a Polish artist who was very influential.  Many of his works mix history with legend and mythology, and nearly all of his works were symbolic in some way.

I like the color palette that he chooses to use in Death. … Read the rest

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