Myasoyedov

This week’s art: Myasoyedov’s The road in the rye

I think it’s important as an artist to look at various kinds of art each day. Just as it is important for graphic designers, filmmakers, authors, and anyone with a creative side, seeing the works of others can help a creative person learn more about what they do.

In that respect, I used to write long articles (here!) about different pieces of art. I learned from writing them, as much as I think others did as well when they commented on the pieces themselves. Over time, that activity was replaced with the quieter activities of resharing what others posted, or of posting to my Pinterest “Inspiration” galleries.… Read the rest

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Russ’ Art Blog: The Plague of Rome

 

I’m all about cheery pics tonight, the other two I was thinking of were pretty dark too.  Something in the air maybe?

This is Jules Elie Delaunay’s Plague in Rome (1869, Oil on canvas, 52″ x 69″), also known as The Angel of Death. I might be wrong, but this isn’t the happiest of images I’ve done with these art blogs. It is, however, one of those pieces that seems to be at odds with itself.

Let’s start with the visual sense of it, especially in the contrast.  The image is virtually split in half, between the light and the dark areas of the work.… Read the rest

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Russ’s Art Blog: “Pushkin’s Farewell to the Sea”

 

Ok, so it’s been a little while since the last one of these art blogs. I’ll see if I can’t post a few more of them, and without the 4 months between them.

Above is Ivan Aivazovsky and Ilya Repin’s Pushkin’s Farewell to the Sea (1887, Oil on canvas), one that caught my eye when I was looking for the new piece.  Probably because it reminds me a bit of one of my favorite pieces, Caspar David Friedrich’s Wanderer Above a Sea of Mist (here).

I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t know a great deal about Alexander Pushkin, the man in the piece.… Read the rest

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Russ’s Art Blog: Seeing it in real life – Pollice Verso

I don’t get to art museums and galleries enough, but it can really give you a different impression of a piece of art.  In this case, last week I was at the Phoenix Art Museum and saw the piece here, Pollice Verso (Thumbs Down) by Jean Leon Gerome (oil, 1872, 38″ x 59″).

First off, I do like the piece overall.  I think it has a good use of color, a very nice balance in composition and a good use of the light and dark shades to create a good contrast. … Read the rest

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The New Art Blog: Assault on Belleau Wood

After a busy (and depressing) holiday season, I’m attempting to restart the art blog idea.  This time though, I’m going to work things a little differently. Instead of just a piece of art each week, I’m going to alternate on artistic ideas.  Some weeks will still be about a certain piece, other weeks about artists or books/graphic novels, and other various art-related themes.  Hopefully people will still tune in.

 

For the first of the new year, I’m talking about Frank E. Schoonover’s “Assault on Belleau Wood“, also known as “How Twenty Marines Took Bouresches” (oil, early 20th century).… Read the rest

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This Week’s Art: Sin

 

 

This is Franz Von Stuck’s Sin (1893, Oil on canvas, 35″ x 21″), which may get my vote for having perhaps the most accurate title of an art piece I’ve seen.

I like the color choices and palette here that Von Stuck used, or rather a lack thereof.  He keeps the colors simple, nearly a duotone.  What he does use for color throughout, due to it’s similarity, is a feeling of almost looking at the woman’s skin even when you’re not.  The colors around the outside are similar in shade and tone to the woman’s body, and it’s a temptation woven into the image.… Read the rest

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This Week’s Art: Ivan the Terrible

Ok, so my “little break” was more like a couple of weeks.  Add “extreme coughing from the lungs” to “Post-Las Vegas” and there you go. But I’m back, and this one is an interesting one for me.  It’s one of the first art pieces that I really took something from, especially in the extreme emotion.

This is Il’ya Repin’s Ivan the Terrible and His Son Ivan on November 16, 1581 (1885, oil on canvas, 79″ x 100″). The artist based it on a real event, involving (natch) Ivan the Terrible.  In the heat of an argument, Ivan stuck his son with his staff, mortally wounding him.… Read the rest

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This Week’s Art: The Premature Burial

 

The fans of Edgar Allan Poe out there should like this one (not that they are probably reading my blog, but it’s worth a try). This is Antoine Wiertz’s The Premature Burial (1854, media/size unknown, aka The Hasty Burial), a piece I first saw many years ago accompanying Poe’s work by the same name (which was painted several years after Poe’s death).

Wiertz’s work often treaded on dark, horrific imagery, as a number of artistic and literary works of the time did.  This one actually is fairly light for him, compared to graphic images like Last Thoughts and Visions of a Decapitated Head or The Outrage of a Belgian Woman.… Read the rest

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This Week’s Art: The Duel After the Masquerade

This is Jean-Léon Gérôme’s The Duel After the Masquerade (1857, Oil, 20″ x 28″), a piece I came across when I was actually looking for another of his works (this one, which may come up again in the future).  It struck me as an interesting piece, and a much different palette than many of Gérôme’s other works.

The setting is pretty much explained in the title, we are seeing the aftermath of the duel. The man’s shocked friends hold him helplessly, and it’s one of the more interesting and eye-catching poses I’ve seen.… Read the rest

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This Week’s Art: The Dead Stretcher Bearer

 

I’m back from the brief hiatus known as the Northeastern Writer’s Conference (NeCon), and I’ve chosen a piece that I haven’t come across before. This is Gilbert Rogers’ The Dead Stretcher Bearer (1916, size and media unknown, possibly oil), a fairly disturbing war piece.

Now, before I get too far ahead, the version above is the one I think is color accurate.  I also found one here that seems differently colored, but also seems to have the tell-tale signs of being a photo of the piece with heavy flash.  If anyone can correct me on it, please do. … Read the rest

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This Week’s Art: Skeletons Warming Themselves

I’m back from a long, long trip to Washington, D.C., with this week’s new art piece. As always, let me know what you think of the art.

This is James Ensor’s Skeletons Warming Themselves (1889, oil, 30″ x 24″), one of the pieces that I’ve been lucky enough to see in person at a museum.  This work can be seen (or was last year at least) at the Kimball Museum in Fort Worth, Texas.

It caught my eye immediately as I was wandering the halls of the museum (which I was doing slowly anyway, since it was 102 degrees outside). … Read the rest

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