From start to finish: Christopher

I’ve been considering doing an ink work of something from the film District 9 for some time, and I finally decided to fit it in here. I managed to fit it in between two other commissioned pieces (call it a “break”).

I also decided that, instead of just an ink work, I’d have fun with it. I’ll probably still go back and do a normal ink work of something from District 9, but this one was fun.

This is the character Christopher from the film. Well, it will be when you see that I’m done with it.… Read the rest

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Seeing it in a museum

I think it’s important as an artist to look at a lot of art, and in fact I love nothing more than to flip through the many art books I have on the shelf. Seeing different styles, different techniques, and just appreciating what others have done is a great way to learn more about art, and to think about doing it better.

Books are great, but to really see a painting I also think it’s important to get to museums. Seeing the real art in person gives you a different look, something that books just can’t do.… Read the rest

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Russ’ Art Blog: Found Drowned

Continuing on my art posts of really happy, joyous images (reference: sarcasm), here is Vasily Perov’s Found Drowned (1867, Oil on canvas, 27″ x 42″). I’ve had a bookmark for it for awhile, and I think it’s an interesting piece.

I think it’s one of those pieces that has a story behind it, but still lets the viewer decide on their own what they think.  It’s obviously not a happy piece, but it also comes across as taking place after the real event in a way that we are now starting the next journey.… Read the rest

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Russ’ Art Blog: The Plague of Rome

 

I’m all about cheery pics tonight, the other two I was thinking of were pretty dark too.  Something in the air maybe?

This is Jules Elie Delaunay’s Plague in Rome (1869, Oil on canvas, 52″ x 69″), also known as The Angel of Death. I might be wrong, but this isn’t the happiest of images I’ve done with these art blogs. It is, however, one of those pieces that seems to be at odds with itself.

Let’s start with the visual sense of it, especially in the contrast.  The image is virtually split in half, between the light and the dark areas of the work.… Read the rest

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Russ’s Art Blog: “Pushkin’s Farewell to the Sea”

 

Ok, so it’s been a little while since the last one of these art blogs. I’ll see if I can’t post a few more of them, and without the 4 months between them.

Above is Ivan Aivazovsky and Ilya Repin’s Pushkin’s Farewell to the Sea (1887, Oil on canvas), one that caught my eye when I was looking for the new piece.  Probably because it reminds me a bit of one of my favorite pieces, Caspar David Friedrich’s Wanderer Above a Sea of Mist (here).

I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t know a great deal about Alexander Pushkin, the man in the piece.… Read the rest

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Russ’s Art Blog: Artist Gregory Manchess

This week, I’m talking about artist Gregory Manchess (www.manchess.com), one of those artists who seems to be able to fit into any genre. Whether it’s work for movies or television, books or magazines, or even just fine art, Manchess has a great ability to capture different ideas in interesting and exciting ways.

If you happen to see the latest National Geographic Magazine in the store (February 2008), you’re getting a look at Manchess’ work.  Along with the cover, Manchess created artwork for the lead story, on the black pharaohs of Egypt.… Read the rest

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This Week’s Art: Sin

 

 

This is Franz Von Stuck’s Sin (1893, Oil on canvas, 35″ x 21″), which may get my vote for having perhaps the most accurate title of an art piece I’ve seen.

I like the color choices and palette here that Von Stuck used, or rather a lack thereof.  He keeps the colors simple, nearly a duotone.  What he does use for color throughout, due to it’s similarity, is a feeling of almost looking at the woman’s skin even when you’re not.  The colors around the outside are similar in shade and tone to the woman’s body, and it’s a temptation woven into the image.… Read the rest

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This Week’s Art: Ivan the Terrible

Ok, so my “little break” was more like a couple of weeks.  Add “extreme coughing from the lungs” to “Post-Las Vegas” and there you go. But I’m back, and this one is an interesting one for me.  It’s one of the first art pieces that I really took something from, especially in the extreme emotion.

This is Il’ya Repin’s Ivan the Terrible and His Son Ivan on November 16, 1581 (1885, oil on canvas, 79″ x 100″). The artist based it on a real event, involving (natch) Ivan the Terrible.  In the heat of an argument, Ivan stuck his son with his staff, mortally wounding him.… Read the rest

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This Week’s Art: The Duel After the Masquerade

This is Jean-Léon Gérôme’s The Duel After the Masquerade (1857, Oil, 20″ x 28″), a piece I came across when I was actually looking for another of his works (this one, which may come up again in the future).  It struck me as an interesting piece, and a much different palette than many of Gérôme’s other works.

The setting is pretty much explained in the title, we are seeing the aftermath of the duel. The man’s shocked friends hold him helplessly, and it’s one of the more interesting and eye-catching poses I’ve seen.… Read the rest

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